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NorthJersey.com: DEP approves sewer easement between Montclair and Clifton



Photo Credit: NorthJersey.com

One more administrative hurdle has been cleared for a proposed sewer relocation project in the Alonzo F. Bonsal Wildlife Preserve.

On March 27, members of the New Jersey State House Commission unanimously voted to approve a Green Acres Diversion Permit to relocate an aging sewer line from underneath the Bonsal Preserve, a project that has been years in the making.

The decision clears the way for the City of Clifton to relocate and replace 2,300 linear feet of 12-inch trunk sewer and associated manhole structures from the interior of the preserve to its northern boundary.


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Environmental Defense Fund: Report: Staggering amounts of toxic chemicals produced across America



Photo Credit: Environmental Defense Fund

Recent spills in West Virginia and North Carolina cast a spotlight on toxic hazards in our midst. But as bad as they are, these acute incidents pale in scope compared to the chronic flow of hazardous chemicals coursing through our lives each day with little notice and minimal regulation. A new report by EDF, Toxics Across America, tallies billions of pounds of chemicals in the American marketplace that are known or strongly suspected to cause increasingly common disorders, including certain cancers, developmental disabilities, and infertility.

While it's no secret that modern society consumes huge amounts of chemicals, many of them dangerous, it is surprisingly difficult to get a handle on the actual numbers. And under current law it's harder still to find out where and how these substances are used, though we know enough to establish that a sizeable share of them end up in one form or another in the places where we live and work.


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NJ Spotlight: 10 Facts About Household Energy Usage in New Jersey



Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Larger houses, and older ones, help explain why almost half of energy expenditures go to home heating.

In a state with some of the nation’s highest energy costs, how people and businesses use and pay for electricity and other types of energy is always a top priority for policymakers. It has led to initiatives to encourage more power plants to be built in New Jersey, to develop renewable resources like solar, and to reduce energy consumption by customers of the state’s gas and electric utilities.


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Newsworks.org: Why N.J. might raid environmental programs to pay for open space


Photo Credit: Newsworks.org

Is it right to take money from environmental clean-up programs to buy open space? That is the dilemma facing lawmakers in New Jersey.

Protecting open space is a high priority for residents in New Jersey, which has the highest population density in the nation. Since 1961 voters have consistently approved using bonds to protect more farmland and fields. But there's a feeling this year that voters might not be in the mood to approve more state spending.


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NJ.com: Massive, $1.7 billion Environmental Cleanup of Passaic River Proposed by EPA


An EPA administrator announces a major cleanup of the Passaic River.
NJ.com

In one of the largest Superfund cleanups ever proposed, federal officials yesterday called for a bank-to-bank dredging of the Passaic River that would remove more than 4 million cubic yards of toxic sediment from the river bottom — enough to fill up MetLife Stadium twice.

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New Jersey Hills: Florham Park's new yard waste collection saves money/environment



Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

FLORHAM PARK -- Cutting the borough’s curbside collection of grass clippings will not only save half the cost, but save the borough’s carbon footprint.

The collection was changed this month and pares the weekly yard waste collections from weekly to bi-weekly, with the borough being split into two routes or either “Week 1” or “Week 2.” Residents who can’t wait for the next collection could bring their yard waste to the borough’s recycling facility, which is now also opened on Friday and Saturday.

In a letter to residents, Borough Administrator William Huyler said the change was made “in an effort to reduce our carbon footprint and become more environmentally friendly.” It will also save money. In the past, the cost for collecting yard waste between April and October averaged $100,000, with collections covering only 484 households, or 13 percent of the residents.


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NewJerseyNewsroom.com: NJ Allergy Season: What to Expect


A patient receiving a skin allergy test.
Photo Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


New Jersey has finally seen a taste of spring with 70-degree temperatures this weekend. But some of us are still paying for the winter that refused to end.

When the spring is shorter due to the prolonged cold weather, plants tend to pollinate all at once, raising havoc for allergy sufferers.

“This year we had an unusually cold winter that lasted longer than normal, and that set back pollen release significantly,” said Estelle Levetin, a biology professor who studies pollen, according to NorthJersey.com. “Each individual plant is not pollinating much more than normal. We’re just having a lot of plants pollinate simultaneously.”


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The Star Ledger: Newark homes not so sweet with toxic vapors seeping inside


Roger Hodge, a site foreman with Environtech LLC, cuts a section of PVC pipe which will be used in the installation of a ventilation systems on homes located on Manufacturers Place that have tested positive for a chemical called TCE. Newark, NJ 4/10/14
Photo Credit:Robert Sciarrino

This is a column about a horror show you pray will never happen to you.

You buy a house you can finally afford in a new neighborhood of 19 two-family homes in Newark’s Ironbound. Manufacturers Place, as the street is called, is not the prettiest of places, adjacent to a truck and scrap metal junkyard and railroad tracks.

The street is too narrow for kids to go out and play soccer or tag. There are no stoops, either, for families to sit out front. It’s just a street with homes, but, hey, at least you have your own home and the pride that goes with being able to say that.

NorthJersey.com: Pequannock River Coalition Gets High Marks for Water Watchdog Work


The PRC protects waterways such as the Pequannock River and Wanaque River Watershed (above)
By Famartin (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons


The Pequannock River Coalition (PRC) is a watershed protection group operating in Morris, Passaic, and Sussex counties. We have been conducting a water temperature monitoring program in our area since 1997. his award-winning program has had a great impact on conditions throughout the Pequannock River Watershed, the Wanaque River Watershed, and has improved regulation of many other waterways statewide. It is easily one of the most effective and cost-efficient of any similar effort in New Jersey.


The Pequannock River Coalition (PRC) is a watershed protection group operating in Morris, Passaic, and Sussex counties. We have been conducting a water temperature monitoring program in our area since 1997. This award-winning program has had a great impact on conditions throughout the Pequannock River Watershed, the Wanaque River Watershed, and has improved regulation of many other waterways statewide. It is easily one of the most effective and cost-efficient of any similar effort in New Jersey. - See more at: www.northjersey.com/news/environment/pequannock-river-coalition-gets-high-marks-for-water-watchdog-work-1.961508#sthash.02CYl4vv.dpuf

The Pequannock River Coalition (PRC) is a watershed protection group operating in Morris, Passaic, and Sussex counties. We have been conducting a water temperature monitoring program in our area since 1997. This award-winning program has had a great impact on conditions throughout the Pequannock River Watershed, the Wanaque River Watershed, and has improved regulation of many other waterways statewide. It is easily one of the most effective and cost-efficient of any similar effort in New Jersey. - See more at: www.northjersey.com/news/environment/pequannock-river-coalition-gets-high-marks-for-water-watchdog-work-1.961508#sthash.02CYl4vv.dpuf

The Pequannock River Coalition (PRC) is a watershed protection group operating in Morris, Passaic, and Sussex counties. We have been conducting a water temperature monitoring program in our area since 1997. This award-winning program has had a great impact on conditions throughout the Pequannock River Watershed, the Wanaque River Watershed, and has improved regulation of many other waterways statewide. It is easily one of the most effective and cost-efficient of any similar effort in New Jersey. - See more at: www.northjersey.com/news/environment/pequannock-river-coalition-gets-high-marks-for-water-watchdog-work-1.961508#sthash.02CYl4vv.dpuf

The Pequannock River Coalition (PRC) is a watershed protection group operating in Morris, Passaic, and Sussex counties. We have been conducting a water temperature monitoring program in our area since 1997. This award-winning program has had a great impact on conditions throughout the Pequannock River Watershed, the Wanaque River Watershed, and has improved regulation of many other waterways statewide. It is easily one of the most effective and cost-efficient of any similar effort in New Jersey. - See more at: www.northjersey.com/news/environment/pequannock-river-coalition-gets-high-marks-for-water-watchdog-work-1.961508#sthash.02CYl4vv.dpuf
The Pequannock River Coalition (PRC) is a watershed protection group operating in Morris, Passaic, and Sussex counties. We have been conducting a water temperature monitoring program in our area since 1997. This award-winning program has had a great impact on conditions throughout the Pequannock River Watershed, the Wanaque River Watershed, and has improved regulation of many other waterways statewide. It is easily one of the most effective and cost-efficient of any similar effort in New Jersey. - See more at: www.northjersey.com/news/environment/pequannock-river-coalition-gets-high-marks-for-water-watchdog-work-1.961508#sthash.02CYl4vv.dpuf
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Editorial: N.J. courts reverse Gov. Christie's misguided rejection of greenhouse gas initiative



Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt


By Times of Trenton Editorial Board

You can’t always get what you want.

The Appellate Division of the New Jersey Superior Court a state reaffirmed that conclusion with its ruling last month that Gov. Chris Christie unilateral decision to remove New Jersey from a regional pollution control effort wasn’t right — or legal.

The three-judge panel found that the Christie administration broke the law by telling power plant operators they did not have to comply with rules of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative established to limit carbon dioxide emissions.

The appropriate means of bowing out of the 2005 agreement with nine other states would have been to repeal or change the rules, say the judges. That route would require the state’s Legislature, controlled by Democrats, to go along with the move — an event as unlikely today as it was three years ago when the governor orchestrated this end run.

The judges’ ruling follows a recent decision by the Board of Public Utilities to pull the plug on a promising offshore wind project. And it comes in the wake of the Christie administration’s diversion of up to $1 billion in ratepayer subsidies that had been intended to fund clean energy projects to cover gaps in the state budgets over the years.

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